AMAIDI Volunteering in India

Portal for international volunteers, interns & professionals

Social Networking

Social Networking

There's no way around it (for non-profits): social networking is here to stay

In 2020 the number of NGO’s in India applying for foreign donations will be half the number we have now. Why? Because the other half is still not – or never going to be – social networking. Using the ‘social web’ or ‘web 2.0’ as it is being called, is increasingly going to be critical in acquiring attention (and who doesn’t get it, doesn’t get it) from ‘important others’. And, lets be honest, this is all that matters for local NGOs who want to implement their social projects for the beneficiaries they serve in the villages and urban areas in India since many years. We have to rephrase the term ‘digital divide’ in ‘social divide’. Not necessary to insert the term ‘digital’ anymore, as the ‘real’ world and its ‘digital’ representation on the Internet are increasingly interwoven. Take public health services, tax payments, agricultural news, marketing and interpersonal communication. More and more people will either ‘also’ or ‘only’ use social networking as a communication tool.

In other words: whether we like it or not, we have to jump on the bandwagon called ‘Social Networking’, get down to the specs as how to use it in our particular (hyperlocal) community.

Here’s a few leads to get yourself started: Social by Social – a Guide to Social Network, How to manage a Facebook group?How Non-Profits Can Use Social Media

Go ahead!

Camille

AMAIDI Volunteering in India

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Filed under: article, charity, information, social networking, Uncategorized, , , , , , , , ,

‘Voluntourism’

Found the next statement on a blog:

“Voluntourism”, the international development charity points out, is a growing market in which increasing numbers of school leavers are paying commercial companies for the privilege of working for nothing in some of the world’s poorest communities. In return, they get a good line for the resume, a clutch of traveller’s tales and a warm feeling created by the sense of doing something worthwhile while getting a key “life experience”.

What do YOU think?

Filed under: article, charity, choice, donating, holiday & volunteering, projects, solidarity, understanding, volun-tourism

Young Volunteers as Vehicles of Change

For every foreign volunteer in India, there are about 1000 local Indian volunteers. Fighting – shoulder to shoulder with their fellow countrymen – private and collective evils like poverty, pollution, corruption, discrimination etc.

There’s a world to learn from our local brothers and sisters:

http://www.worldvolunteerweb.org/news-views/volunteer-stories/doc/young-volunteers-as-vehicles.html

Filed under: article, international volunteers, needs, projects

Managing Far Away Volunteers?

Its the sending agency’s nightmare: a volunteer writing home that things are nog going well at all, blaming the agency that has send him/her for the disaster. How to prevent such a thing from happening? Except the fact that – statistically spoken such an event HAS to happen once in a long while just to keep up the statistics – there ARE tips and tricks that can help preventing the nightmare from happening too often.

I came across an article where you can find just that:

Check out: http://www.worldvolunteerweb.org/resources/how-to-guides/manage-volunteers/doc/technology-and-long-distance.html

Happy reading you all!

Filed under: article, control, international volunteers, management, projects, reliability

"Increased confidence amongst charities" (The Guardian)

More staff than ever employed by charity, volunteer organizations
(from The Guardian)

Charities are signalling their confidence in the future of the voluntary sector by employing more staff than ever before, according to a new voluntary sector salary survey. Despite the number of high-profile charities that have announced redundancies in the last 12 months, the Annual Voluntary Sector Salary Survey 2004 showed that 40 per cent of charities are likely to employ more staff over the coming year. This is a sharp increase from last year’s survey that showed only 25% of charities predicting a rise in staff numbers throughout the year.
Published by survey specialists Remuneration Economics in association with the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), the salary survey points to an increased confidence among charities towards recruitment and retention of staff. Traditionally a volunteer-led sector, approximately one in three charities now employ paid staff, highlighting the increasing professionalism of the work of not-for-profit organisations in the UK.

Although this article per se is outdated, its significance is not. Especially if you consider that this article was written and published *before* the 2004 Tsunami, with in its wake the enormous amount of money made available to existing and aspiring funding agencies in the West who had to spend all this money through local NGO’s. And they still didn’t finish the job!

Filed under: article, charitable business, charity, confidence, donating, finance, not-for-profit organizations, voluntary work

History of volunteerism in India

Found an interesting article on volunteerism in India.

Check out: http://www.worldvolunteerweb.org/news-views/viewpoints/doc/the-changing-face-of.html

If you come across a likewise article, please share the link with us 😉

Filed under: article, history, post, volunteerism in India, worldvolunteer

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AMAIDI helps out evening schools in teaching the children English

AMAIDI Foundation

The AMAIDI Foundation is AMAIDI's latest offshoot. AF is meant to support (ex)volunteers in their funding and implementing projects they support during or after their stay/work in India. For partners in India it is also an instrument that enables them to find (new) sponsors and donors to invest in their projects. And for donors to find the implementing agencies they need to realize their social targets/harvest their profit/social ROI

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